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A1.1 CURRICULUM
STUDY PLAN

START YOUR A1 PRIVATE GERMAN LESSONS NOW!

A1.2 CURRICULUM.
STUDY PLAN

REACH A1.2

IN LESS THAN

4 MONTHS

A1.1 CONTENT 

8 German lessons in total

Finish A1.1 in less than 2 month if you take one lesson per week

CONTENT:

You will learn how to conjugate verbs in German, how to use the proper sentence structure, were to put temporal adverbs (like: today, now, soon), and how to use irregular verbs. You also will learn how to use personal pronouns in Nominative and Accusative, and how to use the standard negation with "nicht" and "kein". 

This package will allow you to introduce yourself and to have a very basic conversation in present tense. Compare to a course at a language school you will only learn the grammar really necessary to communicate and get started.

Personal

pronouns 

Dative  

german-lessons-amsterdam-a1

WHAT DOES A1.1 MEAN?

​This course level is suitable for students who have never studied German or who have very little knowledge. Don't worry if you don't know which level you have to choose. I will check your level at our first lesson.   

WHAT DO I LEARN?

In general: In my lessons, you will speak German from the very first time we meet. 90 percent of the time is used for an oral language training. The difference to a language school is that you interact with a native speaker in German full time. So you will not only learn the grammar but you will also develop the capability to use it. In A1.1 you will learn how to ask and answer questions and to hold a basic conversation in present and future tense. You will also build up the basic vocabulary and the confidence necessary to start and hold a conversation. 

A1.1 CURRICULUM ​

Lessons 1-8 | Content

60 minutes or 90 minutes lessons available

LESSON 01

​CONJUNGATION  

REGULAR VERBS

In contrast to English, the conjugation in German almost always changes depending on the person. Here you will learn the conjugation of most regular and important verbs, as well as some common irregular verbs. You will learn the patterns of verb conjugation and how to apply them to new verbs. 

LESSON 02

SENTENCE STRUCTURE for TEMPORAL ADVERBS

Here I will show you how to use the correct sentence structure for simple sentences in the present tense. The sentence structure is one of the biggest hurdles for many students learning German. Here we particularly practice the positioning of temporal adverbs such as "today" or "tomorrow". But you will also learn to ask the questions and where to position the verb.

LESSON 03

STANDARD NEGATION WITH "NICHT" & "KEIN"

In this lesson you will learn how to correctly negate sentences. The negation is not the simplest thing in German. But it is important to learn it properly from the very beginning. That's why you learn here how to use "not" and "no" correctly: "I don't have a car." (Ich habe kein Auto) versus: "I do not buy the car." (Ich kaufe dieses Auto nicht) versus: I don't drive." (Ich fahre nicht mit dem Auto).

 

LESSON 04

CONJUNCTION of

STRONG VERBS

As in English, there are also many irregular or so-called "strong" verbs in German. Here you will learn how to use these "strong" verbs correctly in the present tense. These verbs are conjugated irregularly in the second and third person. There are typical vowel change patterns that are easy to remember. For example: "ich gebe", "du gibst", "er gibt".

LESSON 05

PERSONAL PRONOUNS 

NOMINATIVE/ACCUSATIVE

While the different articles in the accusative or in the dative are not so important at the beginning, the differences in the personal pronouns are essentially important, even at an A1 level. Personal pronouns in the nominative and accusative are the key to communication in German. Here you will learn the difference between "ich" and "mich" in German. For example: I'm visiting you. ("Ich besuche dich.") You visit me. (Du besuchst mich.").

LESSON 06

PERSONAL PRONOUNS 

IN NOM/AKK & DATIVE

Here you will learn how to use personal pronouns in the dative, especially in connection with accustaiv verbs that have a dative extension (indirect object). This triangular constellation between an active nominative, a passive accusative object and a second person (dative), to whom this action as a whole is directed, represents the core structure of German grammar. If you master this a little, it becomes a lot easier, to learn other grammatical structures late on.

LESSON 07

FUTURE TENSE

Here you will learn how to use the tense of the future in addition to the present tense. For the future you need the auxiliary verb (helping verb) "werden". While you are conjugating "werden", the proper (second) verb moves to the end of the sentence. "Ich lerne Deutsch." versus: "Ich werde Deutsch lernen".

LESSON 08

MODAL VERBS

Similar to "werden" (future tense) modal verbs have a great influence on the structure of sentences in German. Here you will learn how to use modal verbs in the present tense and how to conjugate them correctly. In addition, you will learn the different meanings of "müssen" and "sollen". For example: "You don't have to do this." ("Du musst das nicht machen.") versus: "You mustn't do this." ("Du darfst das nicht machen".) versus: "You supposed to/shall come to the office earlier tomorrow." ("Du sollst morgen früher ins Büro kommen".)  

A1.2 CONTENT 

 8 German lessons in total

Go form zero to the end of A1.2 in less than 4 month

WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?

This course level is suitable for students who have already learned a little German and have knowledge of sentence structure, negation and basic vocabulary. In a nutshell, we can also check out the contents of A1.1 if you'd like to make sure you don't miss out on some of the basics of A1.  

WHAT DO I LEARN?

In this course level you will expand your conversation skills dramatically. You will learn all the basics in order to communicate with your friends. Even your vocabulary is still a little basic here you will achieve the grammatical foundation to express your self in very regular settings. By the time you finish A1.2 you will also have a very solid skill set to be able to study on your own. If you want, you can finish the lesson after this course and use your German environment to improve your language skills.

german-lessons-amsterdam-A1.2

CONTENT:

You will learn how to use "kennen" versus "wissen and "werden" versus "bekommen". You will also be trained how to use the adverbs "gerne" and "lieber" and how to use very handy verbs like "brauchen" versus "müssen" and "mögen" versus the adverb "gerne". In the second part of this section I will also show you how to use past tense (present perfect) which is the biggest step forwards your goal to become fluent in German. On top of this you will learn how to use simple past for certain verbs and how to use very useful expressions like "have been".

A1.2 CURRICULUM ​

Lessons 9-8 | Content

60 minutes or 90 minutes lessons available

LESSON 09

​IMPORTANT ADVERBS:  

"GERNE & LIEBER"

To express yourself if you like something or prefer something can be a little tricky in German. Here you will learn the difference between the adverb "gerne" and the verb "mögen" as well as the difference between the modal verb "müssen" and the verb "brauchen". For example: "Ich mag Liebesfilme". (I like romantic movies.) Versus: "Ich gucke gerne Liebesfilme". (I like watching romantic movies.) Or: "Ich muss nächste Woche nicht arbeiten". (I don't have to work next week.) Versus: "Ich brauche Urlaub" (I need a vacation.). 

LESSON 10

FALSE FRIENDS & OTHER MIX-UPS: "WISSEN vs. KENNEN" & "WERDEN vs. BEKOMMEN"

There are a bunch of verbs which are mixed up by beginners all the time. Here you learn how to use "wissen" and "kennen" as well as "werden" and "bekommen" in the proper context. The second meaning of "werden", for example (becoming, turning, getting), is often confused with the German word "bekommen" (receiving). This is an other so called "false friend" you have to master on this level. For example: "Ich bekomme ein Packet" (I am getting a package) versus: "Wie alt wirst du?" (How old are you turning?).

LESSON 11

PAST TENSE: PRESENT PERFECT WITH "HABEN"

The past tense is indispensable for everyday communication. Here you will learn how to use the present perfect tense in German. This lesson focuses on regular verbs in the past tense, using "haben" as an auxiliary verb werd. For example:

"Ich habe das gestern gemacht" (I did that yesterday).Or: "Ich habe ein neues Auto gekauft" (I bought a new bicycle).

 

LESSON 12

PAST TENSE PART II: AUXILIARY VERB "SEIN"

Verbs that need "SEIN" in the perfect tense as an auxiliary verb are often irregular, have an "en" ending, and often have a vowel change in the root. Here you will learn how to use these verbs correctly. These verbs are mostly verbs that indicate movement or change of state. For example:

"Ich bin nach Berlin gezogen" (I moved to Berlin). Or: "Ich bin krank geworden" (I became ill).

LESSON 13

PAST TENSE PART III: "WAREN" & "GEWESEN"

Here you will learn the past tense forms of "SEIN" as a full verb and how to use "waren" (were) and "gewesen" (have been). While in a conversation (when you are speaking) most verbs in German are used exclusively in the present perfect tense, the full verb "SEIN" can be used in both the perfect and the simple past. For example: "Ich war zu Hause" (I was at home) versus: "Ich bin zu Hause gewesen" (I have been at home).

LESSON 14

PAST TENSE PART IV: THE FULL VERB "HABEN"

"HAVE" is an important verb when used with nouns. However, it is often used in many idioms, which can often be somewhat more complex in nature. Here you will learn how to use "HAVE" in the present perfect as well as in the simple past. The lesson focuses on more complex sayings with "HAVE". For example:

"Ich habe Lust, ins Kino zu gehen" (I want to go to the movies); "Ich habe es eilig gehabt" (I was in a hurry); "Ich habe nichts dagegen gehabt" (I had nothing against it).

LESSON 15

IRREGULAR VERBS IN PRESENT PERFECT

Like in English, there are lots and lots if irregular verbs in German when it comes to past tense. However, you will find it a lot easier when you are able to discover some pattern of these random looking vowel changes. I will show you how to memorise some patterns of those vowel changes these verbs are famous for. For example: "Ich nehme" versus: "Ich habe genommen" ("I take" versus: "I took"). Or: "Ich schreibe" versus: "Ich habe geschrieben" ("I write" versus "I wrote").

LESSON 16

IMPORTANT VERBS IN SIMPLE PAST

Although most verbs in German are mostly used in the perfect tense in conversation, there are a few important verbs that are mostly used in the past tense. Here you will learn how to conjugate and use these verbs. For example: "Ich kannte" (I knew), "Ich wusste" (I knew), "Ich wollte" (I wanted).

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